< News

Howdy ho, kindred urban ecosystem enthusiasts!

You haven’t heard from us in a while, as the Los Angeles Urban Rangers have been in relative hibernation since our Engagement Party residency at The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA) last summer. Huddled together in the den, we’ve been busy whittling a new video about Public Access 101: Downtown L.A., expanding our virtual ranger station, reflecting on our active past, and imagining trails into the future.

We want to announce to you, our steadfast cohort, that we’ve decided to enter into a phase of temporary dormancy (i.e. you won’t see us out and about, at least in uniform, in the coming months), partly due to long-distance migrations and other exciting metamorphoses among our rangers. Rest assured, our spirit of exploration runs strong and we will keep you posted of any and all adventures ahead.

In the meantime, we’re eager to share several new tales about the Rangers that have appeared in recent months:

KCET collected over 30 stories from hikers on our L.A. River Ramble last August, which can be found on Departures. If you have any field notes of your own about experiences on the L.A. River, please let us know!

Amelia Foster reflected on our Critical Campout last September in the Fall/Winter 2011 issue of Public Art Review

Meredith Drake Reitan wrote a short piece about our Malibu safaris in David C. Sloane’s new book, Planning Los Angeles

Bill Kelley's recent article for KCET’s Artbound is a thoughtful reflection on the topography and artistic climate in which we Rangers continue to explore.

 

Longer “external guides” about the Los Angeles Urban Rangers are expected soon and we will keep you posted.

 

As always, we enjoy hearing your stories of urban trail exploration! We’ll add your field notes to our Ranger logs.

 

Your Faithful Stewards,

The Los Angeles Urban Rangers

laurbanrangers.org

 

Ranger Alex explains the hike options from the MOCA Trailhead on a topographic model of downtown.

 

Ranger Ron leads an evening hike through the corporate peaks and meadows of Bunker Hill.

Related Field Sites: Downtown L.A.

Did you know?

The only canine that can climb trees lives in the Baldwin Hills.